Understanding Office 365 with Microsoft experts

Understanding Office 365 with Microsoft experts

Understanding Office 365 with Microsoft experts – Kimberlin roadshow event

Kimberlin Library hosted a visit from Microsoft on 24th October with a roadshow event to help students understand the features, functions and benefits of Office 365 with the aim of helping to drive adoption of Office 365 and how it can help DMU students succeed in their studies.

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Office 365 offers 1TB storage to all students at DMU and the option to download Office on up to five PCs, Macs or mobile devices for FREE

Students who spoke to Microsoft on the day were entered into a prize draw to be in with a chance of winning one of five £50 Amazon vouchers.

The University’s support site for Office 365 can be found here

“Pop-Up” Librarian Drop-in Sessions – NEW

“Pop-Up” Librarian Drop-in Sessions – NEW

Need advice about finding books and journals? Using databases effectively? Improving your referencing skills? How to do an accurate literature search? Subject help?

For all these and more, pop along to our new Librarian Drop-ins: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 2pm-3pm

Kimberlin Library Learning Development Zone (Ground Floor)

 

 

Libraries Week 2017 – #IamLibraryDMU

Libraries Week 2017 – #IamLibraryDMU

Library and Learning Services provides a wide range of services and support to ensure your academic success at DMU.

For Libraries Week (9th-14th October 2017) we’d like to introduce you to some of the names and faces behind the work of @LibraryDMU and to tell you a bit more about what they do. We’ll be adding colleagues to our #IamLibraryDMU page over the course of Libraries Week and we’ll also be sharing via our Twitter and Instagram feeds

Say hello  – we’re here to support your success.

Investment in new power for Kimberlin Library: Temporary weekend closures and alternative study location

Investment in new power for Kimberlin Library: Temporary weekend closures and alternative study location

As Kimberlin Library marks its 40th birthday this year, the Estates Directorate and Library and Learning Services (LLS) are rolling out measures over summer to renew the building’s electrical power distribution and lay the groundwork for future library improvements. This is essential electrical work which unfortunately requires a full shutdown of the building.

Kimberlin Library will therefore be closed on the following dates:

  • Sunday 18 June
  • Saturday 22 to Sunday 23 July
  • Saturday 29 to Sunday 30 July

Alternative provision will be provided in the Hugh Aston Law Library from 10am to 6pm. The Eric Wood Learning Zone and the Greenhouse are unavailable due to Clearing activity. Access to online journals will still be available during these dates.

Richard Partridge, Head of User Experience for LLS explains: “Kimberlin’s electrical switchgear is original equipment from the 1970s which has reached retirement age. This renewal is a major exercise across all four floors, but we’ve been working with Estates and their engineers to carry out the work in a way that will keep disruption to a minimum over three weekends.

“Although Kimberlin will need to close on these days due to the nature of the work, we will be offering alternative study space and PCs in the Hugh Aston Law Library to ensure that our weekend users are catered for.

“While we regret that this may cause some inconvenience to our students, the maintenance work will give us the power to plan and deliver further improvements for Kimberlin users.”

Full details of library opening hours can be found here.

Pictured: Kimberlin’s main switchgear is heading for retirement

KimberlinOldSwitchgearMain

‘Wear dots…raise lots’ – LLS staff supporting RNIB and accessible formats

‘Wear dots…raise lots’ – LLS staff supporting RNIB and accessible formats

Library staff got into the spirit of RNIB’s ‘Wear dots… raise lots’ braille awareness campaign on 6th June and wore their dots to work.

LLS staff also love their cake and a staffroom bake-sale raised £101.66p for RNIB Read. The event was organised by the Library’s Accessible Formats Team who acquire texts in alternative formats as part of our support for students with disabilities.

Information about the Library’s support for students with disabilities can be found at libguides.library.dmu.ac.uk/disability

The RNIB’s campaign to highlight the impact of braille can be found at www.rnib.org.uk/why-wear-dots-and-raise-lots

 

blindspots

 

Key information and statistics from the RNIB

A number of sight loss sector organisations have assessed and agreed a series of key facts for everyone to use.

 Sight loss

How many people have sight loss in the UK?
Almost two million people in the UK are living with sight loss. That’s approximately one person in 30.

Who has sight loss?
Sight loss affects people of all ages, but as we get older we are increasingly likely to experience sight loss.

  • One in five people aged 75 and over are living with sight loss.
  • One in two people aged 90 and over are living with sight loss.
  • Nearly two-thirds of people living with sight loss are women.
  • People from black and minority ethnic communities are at greater risk of some of the leading causes of sight loss.
  • Adults with learning disabilities are 10 times more likely to be blind or partially sighted than the general population.

What are the main causes of blindness in adults?
Age-related macular degeneration is by far the leading cause of blindness in adults. Other significant causes of sight loss are glaucoma, cataracts and diabetic retinopathy.

 

Future projections

How will the number of people with sight loss change in the future?
The number of people in the UK with sight loss is set to increase dramatically in the future. As we get older we are increasingly likely to experience sight loss, and the UK population is ageing. In addition, there is a growing incidence in key underlying causes of sight loss, such as obesity and diabetes. This means that, without action, the numbers of people with sight problems in the UK are likely to increase dramatically over the next 25 years.

It is predicted that by 2020 the number of people with sight loss will rise to over 2,250,000. By 2050, the number of people with sight loss in the UK will double to nearly four million.

Prevention

Many older people are needlessly living with sight loss. Almost two thirds of sight loss in older people is caused by refractive error and cataract.

Both conditions can be diagnosed by a simple eye test. In most cases the person’s sight could be improved by prescribing correct glasses or cataract surgery.

Over 50 per cent of sight loss can be avoided.

Cost of sight loss

What is the cost of sight loss to the UK economy each year?
In 2008 sight loss cost at least £6.5 billion, and this is likely to increase as the number of people with sight loss increases. This figure does not include the cost of sight loss in children.

This cost is made up of:

  • £2.14 billion in direct health care costs, such as eye clinics, prescriptions and operations.
  • £4.34 billion in indirect costs, such as unpaid carer costs and reduced employment rates.

Registration

How many people are registered as blind or partially sighted?
There are around 360,000 people registered as blind or partially sighted in the UK.
How does the registered population relate to the number of people with sight loss?
The almost two million people living with sight loss is an estimate based on how commonly different eye conditions occur. It takes into account factors such as age, gender and ethnicity, and builds up a picture of the numbers of people who are living with significant sight loss in the UK. This picture not only includes people who are registered, but also those who are waiting for treatment, those whose sight could be improved, those who have not registered for whatever reason and people whose sight loss is not at a level that allows them to register. At RNIB we believe that almost two million is a much more accurate reflection of the numbers living with sight loss than using registration figures.

Realities of sight loss

  • Only eight per cent of registered blind and partially sighted people were offered formal counselling by the eye clinic, either at the time of diagnosis or later.
  • In the year after registration, less than a quarter (23 per cent) of people who lost their sight say they were offered mobility training to help them get around independently.
  • Almost half of blind and partially sighted people feel ‘moderately’ or ‘completely’ cut off from people and things around them.
  • Older people with sight loss are almost three times more likely to experience depression than people with good vision.
  • Only one-third of registered blind and partially sighted people of working age are in employment.

 

How busy is Kimberlin Library? Plan your study time

How busy is Kimberlin Library? Plan your study time

april2017

We talked earlier this week about how busy the library was. Here’s an illustration of Kimberlin Library’s occupancy over the last few days – you’ll see why we’ve been recommending an early start to your study day if you can to secure your favourite spot.

See our previous blog post for advice about support and other spaces available for study on campus.